Critical Thinking Application

Critical Thinking Application
Sarah Martin
MGT 350
June 2, 2010
Crystal Hardy

Critical Thinking Application

Everyone thinks. It is our nature to do so. But much of our thinking, left to itself, is biased, distorted, partial, uninformed, or downright prejudiced. Yet the quality of our life and that of what we produce, make, or build depends precisely on the quality of our thought. Shoddy thinking is costly, both in money and in quality of life. Excellence in thought, however, must be systematically cultivated. (Snider & Schnurer, 2006), (Paul & Elder, 2006). There are many ways that critical thinking is important and beneficial in the decision-making process.
Problem-solving is a critical skill.; Critical criteria: Problem-solving, critical thinking and teamwork are key assets to acquire. (Martin, 2002). In order to succeed at any job or task, one needs to be able to solve problems. To do this one needs to think critically. At Martin Services, there are three people in charge: the owner, Edward Martin; the office manager, Sarah Martin; and the field manager, Kristopher Martin. Each of these three people has the ability to schedule services. The schedule is kept in a weekly schedule book. By allowing all three people doing this, times slots are being double or even triple booked. Each time this occurs, the Office Manager is required to contact each client and come up with a solution that makes everyone happy.
Sarah Martin took one week and tallied how many times a service time slot was over booked. Then during the weekly management meeting, she presented the information to the rest of the management team. Through collaborative thinking, they were able to figure out the reasons for this problem. The most inconvenient was the weekly schedule book. The schedule book is always kept in the office. When someone is in the field, he or she does not have access to any future availability. When they finish one job, the client often wants to schedule his or her next one. Clients also have friends who want to start using our services. Without Kristopher having the schedule book in front of him, he can only schedule according to his normal availability.
To solve this, they decided to switch to a computer schedule system. Once this is in place, each employee will be able to view it during his or her field work. Once clearing a service time slot with a client, he or she is immediately to enter the job into the system. This appointment will automatically pop up on the office manager??™s screen. She will then in turn enter the job into the permanent schedule. When each employee views the schedule, it has permanent schedules as well as those that were submitted by other employees.
An open mind is essential to critical thinking. But there is no easy recipe for acquiring an open mind. (Kirby & Goodpaster, 2007). When the management team discussed the situation and brainstormed solutions, they each had to have an open mind. Without that open mind, a solution that everyone liked would never been met. There were many different ways that Martin Services could have solved this business default. If they simply limited scheduling to the office manager, Sarah Martin, then customers would be inconvenienced when trying to schedule future appointments. If everyone were allowed access, appointments could be entered incorrectly and the problem would persist. With allowing everyone viewing access the customers are happy as well as the schedule being correct.
Martin Services now runs smoother and more efficient. Customers are referring more people and the employees are showing better attitudes. When a company has happy employees, the service provided is done better. When a provided service is done better, the clients are happier. Happy clients make a business successful and very happy.

References
Kirby, G. R., & Goodpaster, J. R. (2007). Thinking: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Critical and Creative Thought (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentive Hall.
Martin, S. (2002, August 14). A High Regard for Thinking Skills. New Straits Times, 2(0), 9. doi:148814151
Paul, R., & Elder, L. (2006). Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Learning and Your Life (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Snider, A., & Schnurer, M. (2006). Many Sides: Debate Across the Curriculum (Revised edition). New York, NY: International Debate Education Association.

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